RE/MAX 440
Home My Listings View Area Listings Inside Tours About Me Contact Login Helpful Links Mortgage Info Community Info School Info Tom's Blog Buying Selling Financing Glossary Home Ownership Testimonials

Thomas Skiffington,  CRS, GRI, CRB, ABR, ePro, CLHMS, SRES, RECS, CDPE, ECOBROKER
Thomas Skiffington, CRS, GRI, CRB, ABR, ePro, CLHMS, SRES, RECS, CDPE, ECOBROKER
701 W. Market Street
Perkasie, PA 18944
Phone: 215-453-7883
Office Phone: 215-453-7653
Toll Free: 800-440-remax
Fax: 267-354-6800
email: tom@tomskiffington.com
TwitterFacebookGoogleLinkedinYoutubePlaxo

Tom's Blog

5 Legal Tips If You're Offering Free Wi-Fi

September 12, 2013 6:51 pm

Wi-Fi is slowly becoming like tap water: If your business doesn't want to offer Wi-Fi for free, your customers may see your company as a stingy, anti-technological cretin.

This may be one reason why more and more small businesses are offering free Wi-Fi. In addition to boosting customer good will, gratuitous Wi-Fi acts as a valuable amenity to customer service-based ventures, reports Bank of America's Small Business Community Blog.

But offering anything new, even something for free, comes with its legal nuances. Here are five tips for entrepreneurs thinking about offering free Wi-Fi:

1. Create a Separate Wi-Fi Network for 'Guests.'

Free Wi-Fi for customers does not mean giving out passwords to your business' own Wi-Fi network. Create a separate guest network that provides customers access to the Internet from a router in your location -- one that isn't connected directly to your company's data.

Failing to keep a company's free Wi-Fi network separate from its private network may open your business up to data breaches and the liability that comes with the theft of customers' personal information.

2. Provide Notice of Your Wi-Fi Policy.

While it may be useful to include a "Terms of Service" for free Wi-Fi users to agree to before joining your business' free public Wi-Fi, you may also want to post information about your Wi-Fi policy somewhere in your physical location.

This is especially helpful if you plan on using free Wi-Fi to track customers and their spending habits. http://blogs.findlaw.com/free_enterprise/2013/07/legal-to-track-customers-via-in-store-wifi.html

3. Beware Unwanted Data Use.

You may not appreciate customers hogging in-store Wi-Fi with data-heavy streaming like Netflix or Hulu, but you'll appreciate it much less if your customers use your Wi-Fi to download inappropriate material.

Businesses can prevent certain kinds of Internet traffic with a decent firewall with packet filtering.

4. Use a Commercial Internet Account.

If you run a small business with mostly your own resources, it may be tempting to use your own residential internet account for free customer Wi-Fi.

However, a business account may protect you from some liability if your customers start downloading copyrighted materials.

5. Cover Your Bases With a Prepaid Legal Plan.

You may want to have a lawyer review your terms of service for your free Wi-Fi or ask an attorney about your Internet policy.

Bottom line: While offering free public Wi-Fi may pay off for your business, you'll also want to make sure you've taken steps to limit your potential liability.

Source: Findlaw.com, LegalStreet

 

Tags:

Stop the Spread of Cold and Flu Viruses This School Year

September 12, 2013 6:51 pm

BPT—A new school year is starting and as many parents know, kids are likely to bring home more than their homework at some point. Many catch cold and flu viruses from their classmates, which can then spread to other family members at home. When kids are sick, they miss out on valuable learning experiences and social interactions in the classroom.

On average, elementary school children get eight to 12 colds or cases of the flu each school year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). For the older kids, it is about half that. That's why it's important that parents, teachers and kids work together to stop the spread of germs in the classroom. Everyone can follow these simple steps to help prevent the spread of germs that can cause cold and flu viruses this school year:

Get vaccinated: Getting a yearly flu vaccine is the first and most important step in flu prevention. The CDC recommends that everyone 6 months and older get a flu vaccine each year to protect against the flu virus.

Stay home when sick: If possible, keep kids home from school when they are sick to help prevent teachers and classmates from catching their illness.

Sing and scrub: Make sure kids wash their hands the right way. They should wash frequently with warm water and soap for at least 20 seconds (the time it takes to sing the "Happy Birthday" song twice).

Do the elbow cough: Teach kids to cough into elbows, not hands, since hands are more likely to spread bacteria and viruses through touch.

Disinfect germ hot spots: The CDC recommends disinfecting frequently touched surfaces or objects when someone is ill. In the classroom teachers can use a disinfectant approved to kill cold and flu viruses on desks, computer mice and doorknobs.

"Creating a healthier learning environment starts with small actions that add up to a big impact," says Dr. Howell Wechsler, CEO of the Alliance for a Healthier Generation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping children thrive. "Parents play an important role and can lend a hand to teachers by reinforcing healthy lessons at home and donating useful items like tissues, hand sanitizer and disinfecting wipes."

To provide teachers with the resources they need to help stop the spread of germs in the classroom, the Clorox Company is partnering with the Alliance for a Healthier Generation for "Canisters for Classrooms." For every parent that takes the "Canisters for Classrooms" pledge, Clorox will donate a canister of Clorox Disinfecting Wipes to a school in need and $1 to the Alliance for a Healthier Generation's Healthy Schools Program, which creates healthier learning environments in more than 18,000 schools, reaching 11 million students across the country. To take the pledge and learn ways to help keep your family healthier this school year, visit www.CloroxClassrooms.com. Parents that take the pledge will also receive a coupon, so that they can donate disinfecting wipes and make a difference in their child's classroom, too.

 

Tags:

Car Safety for Kids

September 12, 2013 6:51 pm

Motor vehicles can be dangerous, and when traveling with precious cargo, we know you want to be as careful as possible so everyone stays safe. The following safety tips can help keep your children save when traveling in a car.  

Car Seat Safety

  • Children should be rear-facing until they reach the maximum height and/or weight listed for their given car seat model, usually about the age of two.
  • When using a rear-facing only seat, make sure your car seat base is installed at the correct angle. Babies must ride sitting semi-reclined so their airways remain open. Most infant car seats have built-in angle indicators or adjustors to assist in this process.
  • Any child who has outgrown the weight or height limit for his/her rear-facing car seat should use a forward-facing car seat until they reach either four years old or 40 pounds. A child has outgrown his or her forward facing car seat when the top of his or her ears reach the top of the seat.
  • Always use a five-point harness, and properly position the harness on your child per manufacturer specifications. For rear-facing seats, harness straps should enter the seat below the child's shoulders. For forward-facing seats, they should be at or above the shoulder. Harness straps should lay flat, with no sagging or twisting. The harness must be snug so you cannot pinch a fold in the harness strap at the shoulder after buckling. Place the top of the chest clip at armpit level as chest clips placed too low can cause internal injuries, since this part of the body is not protected by the rib cage.
  • Installations should be tight. You should not be able to move your car seat side to side more than one inch. That said, you should use either the latch system or the seat belt but not both. The car seat should be able to move and flex a small amount to absorb some impact. Car seat harness straps should not be washed. Submerging straps in even plain water can compromise the fire-retardant chemicals that are on them, and using detergents or other cleaning agents can weaken the integrity of the straps.
  • Children should not wear winter coats in harnessed car seats. The added bulk can prevent proper harness tightening. It can also compress during an accident, leaving too much room in the harness and allowing the child to shift dangerously.

Booster Seat Safety

  • All children whose weight or height is above the forward-facing limit should use a belt-positioning booster seat until the vehicle seat belt fits properly. This typically is when they have reached four feet nine inches in height and are between eight and 12 years of age.
  • When using a booster seat, make sure the lap belt lies low and snug across the child's upper thighs, below the hip bones. The shoulder belt should cross the center of your child's chest and shoulder. It should not cut across his/her neck or face. Never put the shoulder belt behind your child's back or under his or her arm.

General Car Safety

  • The safest placement for kids is the center of the backseat. Children younger than 13 who ride in the front seat can risk serious injury – not only from other cars, but from the very airbags that are designed to protect passengers.
  • Be sure to register your child's car safety seat. In the event of a recall, the manufacturer will reach you by mail to let you know of the recall and what steps you should take.
  • Proper installation of child car seats is critical to their function. The Hanover recommends having your seats inspected. For a list of inspection sites closest to you, please visit the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (http://icsw.nhtsa.gov/cps/cpsfitting/).
  • In the event of a car accident, be sure to check with your independent agent to determine whether your car seat needs to be replaced.

Source: www.hanover.com.  

Tags:

Word of the Day

September 12, 2013 6:51 pm

Qualification. Act of determining a potential buyer’s needs, abilities, and urgency to buy and matching these with available properties.

Tags:

Q: How Does the Seller Determine What Rate to Provide?

September 12, 2013 6:51 pm

A: The interest rate on a purchase money note is negotiable, as are the other terms in a seller-financed transaction.  To get an idea about what to charge, sellers can check with a lender or mortgage broker to determine current rates on mortgage loans, including second mortgages.

Because sellers, unlike conventional lenders, do not charge loan fees or points, seller-financed costs are generally less than those associated with conventional home loans. Interest rates are generally influenced by current Treasury bill and certificate of deposit rates.

Understandably, most sellers are not open to making a loan for a lower return than could be invested at a more profitable rate of return elsewhere.  So the interest rates they charge may be higher than those on conventional loans, and the length of the loan shorter, anywhere from five to 15 years.

Tags:

9 Power Foods that Boost Immunity

September 12, 2013 2:39 am

With kids back in school, we enter the season where spreading germs is almost inevitable. It helps to teach kids to wash hands often, and to sneeze into the crook of an arm. But what we eat makes a difference.

From Prevention Magazine comes a list of nine power foods that help boost immunity from colds and flu for every member of the family:

Yogurt – Probiotics, the ‘live active cultures’ in yogurt, are healthy bacteria that keep the intestinal tract free of disease-causing germs.

Oats and barley – The grains contain beta-glucan, a fiber with potent antimicrobials and antioxidants. One or two servings a day in cereal, soup, or other dishes can boost immunity, speed wound healing and help antibiotics work better.

Garlic – Crushed into recipes several times a week, or taken regularly in tablet form, garlic, with its active ingredient, allicin, fights infection and bacteria.

Fish – Salmon and herring are rich in omega-3 fats, which reduce inflammation, increasing airflow and protecting lungs from colds and respiratory infections. The selenium in most shellfish helps white blood cells produce a substance that helps drive flu viruses out of the body.

Chicken soup – Grandma wasn’t lying. Chicken soup acts like a bronchitis drug, blocking the migration of inflammatory white cells. Also, the salty broth keeps mucus thin the same way cough medicines do. Adding garlic and onions can increase immune-boosting power.

Tea - People who drank five cups a day of black tea for two weeks had 10 times more virus-fighting interferon in their blood than those who drank a placebo, in a Harvard study. The amino acid responsible, L-theanine, is abundant in both black and green tea—and in decaf versions.

Beef - Zinc is important for the development of white blood cells, the immune system cells that recognize and destroy invading bacteria and viruses. A three-ounce serving of lean beef provides what you need. Vegetarians should consume zinc-fortified yogurt, milk, cereals.

Sweet potatoes – Skin is a first-line fortress against bacteria and viruses – and healthy skin needs lots of vitamin A. The beta-carotene in sweet potatoes – or other orange veggies, including pumpkin, carrots or squash – is a great way to get it.

Mushrooms – A handful added to pasta sauce, salads, omelets, or pizza increases the production and activity of white blood cells, which effectively help fight infection.

Tags:

Getting the Most Out of Social Security Retirement Benefits

September 12, 2013 2:39 am

Too many people end up getting less than what’s due them from Social Security when they retire because they don’t know the rules and the real financial impacts, says independent retirement advisor Gary Marriage, Jr.

“There’s a lot of talk about the future of Social Security, but we still have this benefit and if you’re 50 or older, you should be planning to make the best use of it,” Marriage says.

Marriage, CEO of Nature Coast Financial Advisors, which specializes in maximizing retirees’ finances, shares important facts to keep in mind as you plan for how Social Security will factor in your retirement:

• “Can I convince you to wait a few more years?” Many people are understandably eager to retire as early as possible; others fear Social Security retirement benefits will suddenly vanish, so they want to get what they can as quickly as possible – at age 62. But if you’re counting on those benefits as part of your income, you should wait until you’re eligible for the full amount. That’s age 66 if you were born 1943-54, and age 67 if you were born in 1960 and later. If you’re in the older group, retiring at 62 cuts your benefits by a quarter; for the younger group it’s nearly a third. “Chances are, you’ll be better of mentally and physically if you wait anyway,” Marriage says. “Many studies show that people live longer and are more vital the longer they remain employed; more importantly.”

• The reductions in Social Security add up to a considerable sum. The average retirement benefit in June of this year was 1,222.43, according to the Social Security Administration. People born in the 1943-54 group who are eligible for that amount at age 66 will get just $916.82 a month if they retire at 62. If they live to age 90, that’s a total of $308,052.36. By waiting just four years, they’ll net an additional $44,007.48. Waiting until age 70 can make you eligible for a bump in benefits – up to 8 percent a year – but there are no increases if you delay longer.

• If divorced, were you married for at least 10 years? Were you married for a decade and aren’t currently remarried? You may be eligible to receive benefits based on the former spouse’s work record. Here are some of the other requisites: you must be age 62 or older, and the former spouse must be entitled to receive his or her own benefits. If the former spouse is eligible for a benefit, but has not yet applied for it, the divorced spouse can still receive a benefit. Additionally, two years must pass after the divorce.

Source: www.naturecoastfinancial.com

Tags:

Kitchen Remodeling 101: Making the Space Your Own

September 12, 2013 2:39 am

BPT—There is a lot to think about when remodeling your kitchen. You want to design a kitchen that reflects your taste and style, which you'll love for years to come. Whether you're designing for yourself or for resale, the key to success is to embrace timelessness. That doesn't mean sacrificing personality for a neutral palette, though. Quite the opposite.

Here are five creative, thrifty and helpful tips from Summer Baltzer, interior designer and former host of HGTV's Design on a Dime, to send you well on your way to a kitchen design that not only looks great in the long term, but also reflects you.

Tip one: Know your style.

Design your kitchen around colors and objects that make you feel great. This is the room you probably spend most of your time in whether you're cooking, entertaining or just doing homework with the kids. Loving the look is important. Make your design meaningful and something you'll want to see every day. Look for inspiration from a pottery collection, a piece of artwork, or even the food you love.

Tip two: Get creative on a budget.

A great way to save money is to repurpose found items for your accents where you can. Frame pictures from favorite recipes, use inexpensive flower pots or mason jars to store utensils and cutlery, repurpose an old console table as a center island. You might even want to spray-paint the old dining table and give it a new life. Look for salvaged floors, pallets or pottery to create new furniture pieces or accents. This approach not only saves you money, but also makes your kitchen enviably unique.

Tip three: Develop your vision.

Keep your ideas on track by collecting loose drawings; they can become your own personal design board. They don't have to be professional or even exactly like the finished product - just enough to make your point and start to envision what the finished product will look like. Seeing your ideas come together before taking a sledgehammer to your old tile not only gets you excited about your project, but can also save you from making design decisions that don't fit your vision. If you're hiring a professional, plans for the kitchen should be included in the cost. Make sure that they fit your vision and that you're getting everything you need from your new space before demo and installation begin.

Tip four: Create timeless beauty.

When focusing on your large installed items, don't just concentrate on what's popular now. Instead, take a look at the items that have been relevant for more than a decade. If you're designing a kitchen for a home you plan on living in for the next 20 years, by all means, go crazy and embrace colors and patterns that make you happy. But if you don't plan on staying there forever, give yourself room to grow. Look to classic color combinations like white, black or gray cabinets; stone countertops with white or walnut cabinets; or butcher block with just about any cabinet color you can imagine.

Tip five: Start with simplicity.

Keep the lines of your installed, more permanent items clean and simple. To add style and versatility, get creative with your accents. For instance, try going Shaker with your cabinets. Traditional cup pull handles will move them in a more classic and traditional direction and linear pull handles will take you down a modern road. By keeping your appliances and more permanent items simple, and using your accents to create a sense of style, you'll open up tons of design doors for yourself, creating a kitchen that transitions easily, keeps up with your style and has staying power.

With this timeless know-how and creative inspiration, you're ready to create a kitchen you'll love both now and a decade down the road.

Source: www.wilsonart.com.

Tags:

Word of the Day

September 12, 2013 2:39 am

As is. Said of property offered for sale in its present condition with no guarantees as to quality and no promise of repair or fix-up by the seller; property is purchased in exactly the condition in which it is found.

Tags:

Q: Should I Sell My Home First or Wait until I Have Bought another Home?

September 12, 2013 2:39 am

A: This is a tough decision, but the answer will depend on your personal situation, as well as the condition of the local housing market.

If you put your home on the market first, you may have to scramble to find another one before settlement, which could cause you to buy a home that does not meet all your requirements.  If you cannot find another home, you may need to move twice, temporarily staying with relatives or in a hotel.

On the other hand, if you make an offer to buy first, you may be tempted to sell your existing home quickly, even at a lower price.

The advantage of buying first is you can shop carefully for the right home and feel comfortable with your decision before putting the existing home on the market.

On the flip side, the advantage of selling your existing home first is that it maximizes your negotiating position because you are under no pressure to sell quickly.  It also eliminates the need to carry two mortgages at once.

Talk with your agent for advice.  Discuss the pros and of each and whether certain contingencies written into the contract can ease some of the pressures.

 

Tags:




Learn more about Philadelphia County, Doylestown, Northampton County, Hilltown, Montgomery County, Ottsville, Chester County and Richlandtown and search all the real estate listings in the Perkasie area MLS. We have packed our site with tons of information about Revere, Hilltown, Ottsville, Doylestown, Perkasie Real Estate and Northampton County Real Estate plus what you need to know about buying and selling a home or condo. I offer full a full range of professional real estate services. On this Perkasie real estate site find Perkasie In Town and Suburban Properties, Land, Lots, Perkasie Golf Homes for Sale, Luxury Estates, Town Homes, Perkasie New Homes for Sale, Perkasie Condos, Town Homes, Real Estate, Perkasie Luxury Estates, Equestrian Estates and Perkasie Executive Homes For Sale. Search for Homes for Sale in Perkasie. You can also Search for Homes for Sale in Lehigh County and it's surrounding counties. Lehigh Valley Real estate ad Lehigh Valley homes or properties for sale.

Tom Skiffington - RE/MAX 440 - PERKASIE

Franconia Pennsylvania real estate, Line Lexington Pennsylvania, Hilltown Pennsylvania, Revere PA properties, Trumbauersville PA properties, Gardenville PA, Kulpsville PA, Erwinna Pennsylvania homes for sale, Philadelphia County PA, Northampton County properties, Bucks County PA real estate, Blooming Glen Pennsylvania, Perkasie PA, Kintnersville properties, Richlandtown real estate, Mainland Pennsylvania, Bedminster PA, Montgomery County Pennsylvania properties, Hatfield PA homes for sale, Chester County Pennsylvania, Pipersville PA, Dublin Pennsylvania properties, Fountainville real estate, Upper Black Eddy properties, Plumsteadville properties, Souderton properties, Danboro Pennsylvania, Quakertown properties, Jamison Pennsylvania properties, Doylestown Pennsylvania real estate, Chalfont PA, Ottsville real estate, Sellersville homes for sale, Earlington PA homes for sale, Ferndale PA homes for sale, Colmar real estate, Lehigh County Pennsylvania real estate, Silverdale real estate, Tylersport PA homes for sale, Warrington PA homes for sale, Telford Pennsylvania properties