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Tom's Blog

Energy Efficiency through Insulation Key to Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions

April 22, 2014 1:44 am

With today marking the 44th anniversary of Earth Day, the North American Insulation Manufacturers Association (NAIMA) reminds the public about the key role of fiber glass and mineral wool insulation in achieving greater energy efficiency and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. "Buildings account for 40 percent of energy use worldwide," NAIMA Interim President and CEO Angus Crane said. "Reducing energy use and greenhouse gas emissions are global priorities and among the easiest, most impactful ways to do that is ensuring all buildings are energy efficient. Properly insulating and air sealing buildings is critical to optimizing energy efficiency and reducing costs to building owners."

This winter, which saw many states break decades-long records for cold temperatures, reminded many homeowners of the costs of under-insulated homes: high energy bills. NAIMA estimates that some 40 million U.S. homes are under insulated and adding insulation is a relatively simple, low-cost home improvement that offers benefits that are friendly to the pocketbook and the planet. Additional insulation can reduce utility costs by as much as 30 percent and overall energy use by 50 percent when compared with an uninsulated building.

"Earth Day also provides an opportunity to acknowledge the efforts of businesses, industries and governments in educating the public about global sustainability and climate change," Crane said. "NAIMA applauds the many organizations that promote energy-efficient policies to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels and improve the future of the planet."

Notwithstanding the significant environmental benefits of insulation, there are many other advantages, including insulation's role in improving public health. A 2004 study conducted by Harvard University School of Public Health found that adequate levels of insulation improved public health by limiting the effects of outdoor pollutants on the population. In addition, properly insulated buildings also offer better acoustical control. Homeowners may also take advantage of financial incentives and tax credits offered by a number of jurisdictions and entities throughout the United States to make homes more energy-efficient by doing such things as adding insulation.

"It is not an overstatement to say that we can insulate our way to a brighter future and at the same time, control our increasing energy costs," said Scott Miller, chairman of NAIMA's Sustainability Subcommittee. "Insulation is a simple solution to a weighty global challenge -- reducing energy use and greenhouse gas emissions -- but it clearly offers a myriad of benefits."

Source: naima.org

Published with permission from RISMedia.

What Says Vacation in Any Language? A Perfectly Packed Suitcase

April 22, 2014 1:44 am

Summer is around the corner and many across the country will be jet-setting off on wonderful and warm adventures. But what should you bring and what can you do without? Here are a few steps travelers can take to make packing perfect.

Step one: Weight, size…
Understand limitations. Traveling by car, with an empty trunk to fill? In this case, the more the merrier! But for those traveling by air, it is worth looking into weight and size restrictions to eliminate those last minute surprises when checking it at the airport. Most airlines enforce a 50 pound weight restriction for checked bags. Find out what the maximum weight is for your chosen airline and pack accordingly.

Step two: The essentials
Make a master list of everything needed, every day. This list can include all the basics, like a toothbrush and toothpaste, and all personal must-haves, like special face cream or hair straightener. Keep this list and re-use it for the next trip!

Step three: Mix and match
Forget total outfits. First, consult the local weather forecast. Then, choose a basic color theme and stick with it – blacks or navies, whites or creams – so that you can pack a set of mix and match basics. Pack familiar items – now is not the time to experiment with new pieces. Leave behind articles which wrinkle too much or show wear too easily. And take multifunctional pieces like a blazer or cardigan to coordinate with pants or a dress. With the space saved, there is room for one or two extravagant items – or for souvenirs picked up along the way!

Step four: Shoes, shoes, and more shoes!
Oh, the agony! Again, sticking to a color theme will make decisions so much easier. Take a comfortable pair of shoes, as traveling always involves a lot of walking. Then take one pair that can dress anything up for the evening. And finally, wear the biggest pair while travelling. As for purses, the same rules apply – take one for the day, which can possibly double as a second carry-on bag, and a little bag for the evening, which can easily slip into the suitcase.

Step five: Toiletries
Searching for a little piece of home away from home? For many people, that comes in the shape of toiletries and cosmetics. Always remember the 100 ml rule – anything larger than 100 mls can only be packed in checked luggage. And collect samples of favorite brands to use during the trip. This will drastically reduce the volume of toiletries required.

Step six: Accessories
If there is one area people can pack a few outstanding items in, this is it! Pack all the basics, and sneak in a few extras just in case. Those sparkly earrings? Check. A bangle bracelet? Why not?

Step seven: Packing vs. unpacking
One last rule? The less you pack, the less you have to unpack!

Source: DELSEY

Published with permission from RISMedia.

Most Americans Incorrectly Believe Wind Speed Determines Hurricane Evacuation

April 21, 2014 1:09 am

A national Harris Interactive Survey commissioned by the nonprofit Federal Alliance for Safe Homes (FLASH)® has revealed some frightening perceptions regarding hurricane evacuation. The survey found that a vast majority of Americans, 84 percent, mistakenly base their life or death evacuation decisions on the hurricane category and/or wind speed. In fact, hurricane evacuation boundaries are based on the threat of water, not wind, and nearly all evacuation orders are issued due to threat of inland flooding and storm surge.

"Most people think of wind with a hurricane, but in recent years, water from storm surge and inland flooding has done the most damage and killed the most people," said Rick Knabb, Ph.D., Director of NOAA's National Hurricane Center (NHC). "Families need to find out if they live in an evacuation zone today, have a plan in place and immediately follow evacuation orders when issued."

Tropical storms, Category 1 and 2 hurricanes, post-tropical cyclones and even Nor'easters can all cause life-threatening storm surge. In 2008, Hurricane Ike made landfall as a Category 2 hurricane, bringing storm surge of 15 to 20 feet above normal tide levels. In 2012, Tropical Storm Debby produced storm surge of seven feet in the Florida Panhandle. Often, heavy rains from hurricanes and tropical storms cause flooding well inland from the initial strike zone.

"People underestimate the force and power of water," said FLASH President and CEO Leslie Chapman-Henderson. "During Superstorm Sandy, the Sochacki family of Union Beach, N.J., lost their home when it was broken apart and swept out to sea. In the middle of the storm, they were forced to take shelter in an elevated, concrete home next door."

New evacuation resources available
Beginning this hurricane season, the NHC will issue an experimental Potential Storm Surge Flooding Map for areas along the Gulf and Atlantic coasts of the United States that are at risk of storm surge from a tropical cyclone. These real-time maps will show areas where storm surge could occur and how high above ground the water could reach in those areas. The interactive map will be available at www.hurricanes.gov when hurricane or, in some cases, tropical storm, watches or warnings are in effect.

Additionally, FLASH has compiled available online resources on evacuation zones and storm surge mapping for the 222 coastal counties, parishes, and regions from Texas to Maine to help families determine if they reside in an evacuation zone.

Other myths revealed
The annual Harris Interactive survey tests homeowners' hurricane beliefs regarding safety and property protection. Some of the other widely held myths included:

MYTH: It costs more than $10K to make a home stronger against hurricanes
FINDING: 69 percent of Americans believe this to be true
FACT: There are affordable methods and products that minimize damage and the need for costly repairs, including:
• Garage doors are often the most vulnerable opening on a home in a hurricane, but they can be braced for as little as $150.
• Windows and sliding glass doors can be protected from flying debris with temporary plywood shutters for $275 to $750 or with corrugated steel or aluminum shutters from $7 to $15 per foot.
• Roof uplift resistance is critical in high wind and it may be tripled by applying a 1/4 inch bead of APA AFG-01 certified wood adhesive along the intersection of the roof deck and roof rafter or truss chord on both sides of the beam.
• Water intrusion through the roof deck joints is a common source of damage; however, peel and stick water barrier can be applied during re-roofing for as little as $750.

MYTH: Taping windows helps prevent hurricane damage
FINDING: 54 percent of Americans believe this to be true
FACT: Taping windows wastes preparation time, does not stop windows from breaking in a hurricane, and does not make clean-up easier. In fact, taping windows may create larger shards of glass that could cause serious injuries. Masking tape, duct tape, window film and specially marketed "hurricane tape" are insufficient and potentially dangerous. Use tested and approved hurricane shutters or other opening protection instead.

Source: Federal Alliance for Safe Homes (FLASH)

Published with permission from RISMedia.

Keys to a Healthy Home on a Budget

April 21, 2014 1:09 am

The Healthy House Institute (HHI) has released Keys to a Healthy Home on a Budget, designed to inform both professionals and consumers alike about how to upkeep a healthy home on a budget.

"Most healthy-home factors involve a prevention or 'removal' strategy hence are inexpensive or free to apply if addressed early," said Allen Rathey, president of The Healthy House Institute (HHI). "While the steps to a healthful home are basic and well-known, they are frequently neglected, prompting us to reinforce awareness and application of cost-effective, simple measures."

Keep It Dry

Keeping homes dry helps prevent the growth of mold, other microbes, and related health problems. Mold and bacteria need moisture to survive and thrive. Lowering a home's relative humidity through proper exhaust ventilation (e.g., running bathroom and shower fans for 30 minutes after showering or bathing), controlled mechanical ventilation (often as simple as installing a box fan facing outward in one open window and opening another window elsewhere in the house), and dehumidification in basements and where excess moisture occurs (dehumidifiers are available from big box retailers for less than $200), while sealing up unintentional airflows (i.e., drafts and air leaks) using caulking and sealants; go a long way toward promoting dryer, healthier home environments.

Keep It Clean, Contaminant-Free

Floor mats are inexpensive 'cleaning tools' -- placing one inside and outside a home's main entrance helps reduce indoor contaminants such as moisture, pesticide dust, heavy metals from industrial processes, and other pollutants. Often, the larger the mat, the more soil is removed.

Also, mild soap or detergent, and water, are thrifty but effective ways to remove soil and germs without resorting to expensive commercial products. Microfiber cloths and mops often clean well with just water.

Removal of germs is as important (or perhaps more so) than poisoning them: For example, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says, "Disinfectant/detergent formulations registered by EPA are used for environmental surface cleaning, but the actual physical removal of microorganisms and soil by wiping or scrubbing is probably as important, if not more so, than any antimicrobial effect of the cleaning agent used."

Still, there is a time and place for disinfectants, and non-chemical interventions such as steam vapor or UV wands may be helpful.

10 Healthy Cleaning Principles
1. Remove, do not add contaminants.
2. Remove, do not add or stir dust.
3. Remove, do not routinely poison germs.
4. Remove, do not add allergens.
5. Minimize chemistry, maximize results.
6. Disinfect touch points daily.
7. Use ergonomic tools.
8. Use fragrance-free products.
9. Use residue-free products and processes.
10. Use non-toxic methods.

Keep It Pest-Free

Keeping homes clean, dry and well-sealed prevents pests from finding harborage. This is part of Integrated Pest Management or IPM. According to NSF International, IPM "is an environmentally friendly pest management approach that emphasizes multiple methods of non-chemical pest control and prevention." Don't be afraid to call for professional assistance from companies with a strong IPM policy, but you can do a lot yourself by keeping kitchens and homes clean and dry, and not leaving dirty dishes around the home.

Keep It Ventilated

Fresh air is your friend, so be sure your home gets enough. Be sure every bathroom, shower, toilet, and utility area has a working exhaust fan to pull damp and/or unhealthy air out, and fresher air in. Use the exhaust fan over the stove to remove cooking smells and related airborne contaminants (e.g., natural gas stoves release carbon monoxide, so are especially important to vent well). Controlled mechanical ventilation can be as simple as using a box fan in a window, or as complicated as installing a Heat Recovery Ventilator (HRV), which exhausts stale air as it brings in fresh air, but saves energy by transferring heat or cooling from one airstream to the other using a heat exchanger.

Keep It Safe, Maintained

Remember to have your home inspected by a qualified expert every few years to find problem areas. Ask visitors to give your home a "sniff test" to detect mold, airborne contaminants, or general staleness. Visitors not acclimated to a home's "normal smells" can be more objective when detecting unwanted odors. This is not a substitute for professional inspection, but can help.

Be sure your bathtub has hand railings for elderly loved ones, and areas inside and outside your home are well-lit. Outdoor lighting is a deterrent to crime, and LED bulbs can stay 'On' all night without running up electric bills.

Published with permission from RISMedia.

Will You Use Your Tax Refund on a Dream Vacation Like Many Americans?

April 21, 2014 1:09 am

To get the biggest bang for your buck, here are some strategies you can use to turn even a lean refund into your dream vacation.

1. House Rules
Book a vacation house over a hotel to make your vacation bucks go the furthest. Houses typically hold more people with fewer fees. Living like a local in a unique vacation house can often be a priceless experience.

2. Do Not Seek Peak

Avoid peak season dates to save hundreds if not thousands. Peak season varies tremendously by location, so be sure to closely study rate lists.

3. Mom Was Right - It Is Best to Share
Even though it’s fun to make friends jealous by posting your sunny vacation pictures on Instagram, it’s much savvier to bring your friends along and split the tab. Sharing a house can double the fun and halve the cost. For the biggest savings, organize a beach getaway for the girls or a golf trip for the guys so that you end up with many friends staying together in a larger vacation house. Splitting with couples or another family is also a win-win.

4. Dine In, Not Out
Look for a full kitchen, dining area with plenty of seating and nice outside patio grilling area. Make sure there’s a grocery store nearby and also a variety of reasonable takeout options. Assign everyone a day to provide easy buffet-style meals or treat the group to inexpensive takeout.

5. Be Greedy about Freebies
Why pay sky-high fees for Internet, parking and resort amenities at hotels when most vacation houses offer numerous amenities for free? Look for vacation houses that include beach access, private pools, WIFI, parking, premium cable channels and welcome gifts at no cost. When you find an attractive vacation house scoring high reviews with loads of freebies, book it fast!

Source: Beach Bound Escapes

Published with permission from RISMedia.

BBB Says Beware of Online Computer Repair Services

February 24, 2014 6:51 pm

If you own a computer, this report is for you. I was just contacted by Howard Schwartz, Executive Communications Director for Connecticut's Better Business Bureau.

Schwartz suggests anyone having computer problems requiring expert advice should research online repair companies with BBB first, or proceed at their own risk when allowing someone to take control of any computer.

Better Business Bureau nationwide received 5,045 complaints about computer service and repair companies over the past 36 months. Schwartz says the complexity of computers puts consumers who lack tech-savvy at the mercy of unscrupulous operators.

Connecticut BBB recently identified a pattern of complaints within the online computer repair industry, including misrepresentation, ineffective service, additional technical problems after the service, destroyed files, questionable sales practices and delays in providing refunds.  

In addition, consumers said they were deceived into believing they were dealing with BBB Accredited Business when in fact they were not, and Schwartz says one company illegally used a BBB seal on its website.

Several consumers were also misled by ads and pop-ups, thinking they were dealing directly with manufacturers rather than a computer service company. Others said their computers no longer functioned after being serviced.

Consumers also complained that they were repeatedly contacted by online computer repair companies, in violation of Do Not Call Registry laws. And some businesses used scare tactics to get customers to buy service contracts.

One scammer technician told a Chesterfield, MI, woman calling about a faulty wireless router that her computer was "...so badly compromised that it was a matter of ... days before my entire identity would be stolen and I could end up 'blacklisted,' and that it would cost $650 to fix."

Another consumer in Riverside, CA, said one company scanned his computer, and "...restricted my antivirus program I've been paying for - so they could sell me their own."

BBB sent letters to a number of these computer service and repair companies asking them to address underlying causes of complaints, and has detailed those concerns in business reviews where applicable at bbb.org.

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Deck Design: Bigger Is Better

February 24, 2014 6:51 pm

As homeowner's look ahead to warmer weather, many are dreaming of summer days spent on a brand new deck. So what is new in the deck design section of home building? Builders and manufacturers agree, the current big trend in decks is just that: big.

"People are wanting to extend the indoor living space to the outside," says Tim Stephens, owner of Archadeck of West Central & Southwest Ohio, who has built several decks in Dayton and Cincinnati that measure 1,500 square feet or more. "Inside, you have a dining room, kitchen, living room, and family room. We're designing the same things in the deck: an area for dining, a sitting or socializing area, and then a cooking area."

The 200-square foot deck is increasingly looking like a relic of the past as homeowners push for more outside living space, and remodelers and builders line up to accommodate them.

Building a deck that's as big as a small house takes more time, planning, and designing than building a small one, notes Stephens. Even a big deck shouldn't have any wasted space. It's time-consuming to design each section of the deck so it caters to the homeowner's plan for using it.

Here are 10 ideas from deck builders and industry experts to consider when building a big deck:

1. Think in layers. Decks—large and small—used to be flat, square, single-surface spaces. But the larger the deck, the more it calls for curves, multiple levels, staircases, built-in seating, and railings.

2. Capture the curves. Flexible composite decking is a favorite among deck builders who are partial to curved surfaces, sidewalks, and staircases, which can create an eye-catching segue between two levels of the deck.

3. Move the eye along. Add a focal point or two to a large, empty span of deck by building a planter or fire pit in the middle and lining the perimeter with built-in seating.

4. Create drama. Accentuate curves, railings and fascia boards with a contrasting color to create a frame around the deck floor. Incorporate inset designs, like diamond shapes in alternate colors, to create something unique for each homeowner. And don't be shy about mixing materials on a big deck: faux stone columns, a metal roof, or a granite countertop on a built-in food preparation area will make the outdoor room look more upscale and custom-designed.

5. Proportions matter. An 1,800-square-foot deck on the back of a 2,000-square-foot home is probably too big to "go" with that house. Size up within reason.

6. Add some shade. A homeowner who springs for a 600-square-foot-plus deck is going to want to use it as often as possible. A pergola, awning, canopy, or roof over the deck will allow the client to cook, entertain, or relax outdoors even on hot, sunny days or during rain showers. Any shade structure should be as low-maintenance as the deck itself.

7. Prepare homeowner/clients for a long wait. It takes a long time to build a big deck. Especially if the outdoor room will be home to electric and gas appliances, the job will include an electrician, a plumber, and the local building inspector. If the deck includes multiple tiers, the builder might need to consult with an engineer or architect.

8. Consider the view. If the upper tier of a two-story deck is right over the lower one, take care with the placement of the posts so they're not too close to doors and windows, where they can block the homeowner's view and path to the yard. Also, build in an under-deck gutter to catch rain that falls on the upper deck so it won't soak the deck's lower level and its inhabitants.

9. Leave enough room. Even a big deck can run out of room if the design includes a hot tub. A typical 7-by-7-foot spa takes up at least a 10-by-10-foot space so there's enough room around it for a railing, a privacy screen or a path for bathers and maintenance techs to walk around it.

10. Make it useful. Include heat and light so the owners can use their deck after dark and during at least three seasons. Popular options: built-in fireplaces and fire pits and ceiling-mounted heaters. You'll have plenty of room for them.

Source: http://www.remodeling.hw.net

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Word of the Day

February 24, 2014 6:51 pm

Deed of trust. Document resembling a mortgage that conveys legal title to a neutral third party as security for a debt. Also called a trust deed or deed in trust.

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Q: What Is the Best Way to Find a Real Estate Agent?

February 24, 2014 6:51 pm

A: Begin by asking someone that you know. Friends, relatives, co-workers, or neighbors who have recently purchased a home can give you a firsthand account and attest to the agent’s professional abilities. Sometimes an agent you contact will refer you to another one who works more closely with buyers and sellers in your neighborhood. Once you have a list of names, interview at least three agents and ask questions about their community knowledge, professional experience, and commitment—some agents work full time; others only work at nights and on the weekends. 

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4 Retirement Survival Tips for a Volatile Stock Market

February 21, 2014 8:21 pm

More and more Americans – 28 percent in 2013 -- say they’re not at all confident they’ll have a comfortable retirement, according to an annual survey by the Employee Benefit Research Institute.

Even the wealthiest among us have concerns; 38 percent of U.S. multi-millionaires are not “very confident” about their retirement income, a 2013 U.S. Trust survey found.

“A ‘comfortable’ retirement means different things to different people,” notes Haitham “Hutch” Ashoo, co-founder of Pillar Wealth Management, (www.pillarwm.com).

“The first thing you need to determine is what ‘comfortable’ means to you to ensure you have what you most desire in retirement.”

Most retirees and pre-retirees will depend on income from their investments to maintain their desired lifestyle, says Chris Snyder, Pillar’s co-founder. Any dramatic negative market volatility that’s not fully understood can be devastating to their mindset and planning. “As wealth management advisers, we anticipate – based on historical patterns – an average 5 percent drop in the market about three times a year,” Snyder says. “Advisers should be planning for that. We tell our clients, ‘Don’t focus so much on the drop – we’ve planned and accounted for these predictable, recurring negative events. Instead, we should evaluate whether it will prevent you from reaching your life goals.’ ”

Ashoo and Snyder offer these tips for those worried about the volatility in today’s market:

1. Have a deep understanding of your retirement life goals. If you don’t have clear life goals, neither you nor a financial adviser can create a map to get you there, says Ashoo.

“Think about what kind of cars you wish to drive; whether you’d like one or more vacation homes; where in the world you’d like to play golf; whether you want to budget $10,000 a year for travel or $250,000,” he says. “You also need to think about your beneficiaries and/or charitable causes that are near and dear to your heart. What sort of financial legacy do you desire for them?”

2. Do you or your financial adviser have a reliable process for evaluating your progress toward your life goals? You need to know whether a drop or correction in the market is going to affect your ability to meet your life goals, so you can adjust for that, says Snyder. Simply measuring investment performance is not a reliable means of determining whether a person is on track to meet their life goals.

“We create a wealth management analysis that stress tests their retirement life goals through a simulation of stock, bond and cash activity from 1925 through 2013,” he says. “That includes recessions, depressions, catastrophes, bull and bear markets, and high and low inflation. We do this on a quarterly basis, since the market is constantly changing.”

The analysis produces a score that reflects the level of confidence their clients can have that they will meet their goals. If the score is not between 75 and 90 percent, the advisers consider “what if” scenarios with their clients.

3. Avoid destructive investor behavior. Human nature is counter-intuitive when it comes to investing, and that can lead to bad decision-making, Snyder says.

“Even the smartest, biggest institutional investors make the mistake of allowing their emotions to guide their judgment,” he says. “When the stock market goes up, people’s enthusiasm goes up and they rush to buy, which increases their risk. Then a correction occurs and they find themselves overweight in equities and they wonder what happened.”

This destructive behavior can have a devastating impact on their plans in retirement. Snyder says it is not worth assuming more risk if you have an analysis that shows you are able to achieve your retirement goals with less risk.

4. Once you’ve accomplished 1, 2 and 3, let your financial professionals do the work. It may be hard to turn a deaf ear when friends or family insist you should act or react because of something they’ve read or heard in the news, or because of an experience they’ve had. Let your professionals guide you, Ashoo says.

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